The Best Flooring Installation Guides and Instructions

by Amelia Atkins on May 28, 2017

in Works

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You might not think so, but flooring plays a major role in how a room looks and feels, but choosing the right one for you is much more complicated than deciding for the best-looking one. You have to consider several other factors, such as your budget, lifestyle, the existing décor and the amount of traffic the floor will need to endure in that specific room.

Sounds easy enough, right? Well, with the number of different materials to select from and each of them having their subcategories, this becomes quite a daunting task. To save you from endlessly scrolling through the web, we’ve prepared a short guide about the most popular flooring types.

Hardwood

Hardwood flooring has been a favorite pick for interiors for as long as we can remember, and that should be no surprise. Besides providing a room with a unique warm and welcoming feel, it is durable, easy to maintain and repairable. However, despite the fact that it can last for ages, it is very susceptible to wear and tear, so it is not a great choice for high-traffic areas. It’s most popular type is oak, but cherry is also making its mark. It comes in various types, with different requirements when it comes to installing. Prefinished boards allow you to DIY the installation, while parquets are more complicated.

Bamboo

One of the most eco-friendly flooring materials, bamboo also brings a touch of nature into one’s home. It doesn’t provide that rustic appeal like wood, but it goes well with modern décor trends, such as Scandinavian. Although a woodie grass by its nature, bamboo has the strength of steel, which makes these floors highly durable and resistant. Since it is always pre-finished and produced with tongue-and-groove joints, bamboo flooring is very simple to install.

Laminate

Laminate flooring is very popular, due to its price and its look which is similar to wood. Laminate is in fact a composition of different wood-based materials that are layered together and then topped with a wooden grain. The edges and ends of each plank or tile are designed to snap together, so there is no nailing during installation.

Linoleum (Marmoleum)

This is a green flooring choice made from all natural materials and it doesn’t deplete forests. Linoleum is usually made of wood flour, rosins and linseed oil. It is a very durable and easy to maintain floor type. There are a lot of subcategories of linoleum, but the popularity of marmoleum in Sydney and other major cities didn’t happen by chance. This product offers innovative design, a range of different colors and patterns, and completely natural and recycled ingredients. There are two types of linoleum/marmoleum when it comes to installation: sheet, which is stiff and difficult for DIYers; and tiles, designed as a part of a floating flooring system.

Tile

A popular choice for the kitchen and bathroom due to its durability and resistance to high traffic, tile comes in many different versions, starting from affordable porcelain to costly natural stone. Depending on that, it is more or less slippery. Installing this type of flooring is better left to professionals, since it requires cutting, fitting, laying and grouting.

Concrete

Praised for its durability and raw appearance, concrete is one of the hottest flooring trends today. It’s not exactly what we’d call a “beauty queen”, but it fits in well with popular minimalistic designs. Concrete is the easiest type of flooring to maintain, and probably the most durable too. It allows experimenting with stamping and staining. Installing concrete flooring is not in the DIY domain, since it includes pouring and leveling.

There are plenty of other flooring options, such as cork and vinyl, but these six are the most popular choices. Each of them has its advantages and drawbacks, but eventually, they all serve their purpose once laid out in a room with the appropriate amount of traffic.

Amelia is an author on the site Smooth Decorator and now a fresh architecture student.Love for architecture and design runs in her family ever since she can remember.

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